The Descendants book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Narrated in a bold, fearless, unforgettable voice and set agains. The Descendants is a novel written by Kaui Hart Hemmings. The American film The Descendants, directed by Alexander Payne, with the adapted. Praise. “A Pandora's box–style tragicomedy [Kaui Hart Hemmings's] comic sense is finely honed in this refreshingly wry debut novel.”—The New York Times .

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    The Descendants Book

    The Descendants: A Novel (Random House Movie Tie-In Books) [Kaui Hart Hemmings] on dingharbasuppprom.ga *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Now a major . Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Hemmings's bittersweet debut novel, an expansion of her first published short story ("The Minor Wars," from House. From Book 1: Evil tree. Bad Apple? Twenty years ago, all the evil villains were banished from the kingdom of Auradon to the Isle of the Lost--a dark and dreary.

    Why are you drawn to writing about this demographic, and how do you channel their voices? Kaui Hart Hemmings: Teenagers are a reflection of us—what we value, what we wear, how we speak, how we treat each other. I like working with them for this reason. I also use them because their voices come naturally to me. What made you make Matt King a first-person narrator?

    Mal then got everyone to call Uma the name Shrimpy. Fast-forward to Descendants , Uma watches Carlos , Jay and Evie board the royal limousine to be taken to Auradon for a chance at a better life. Uma seethes with envy when she finds out that Mal was also chosen. From that day forward, she vowed to get off the island and into Auradon. Then came the day of Prince Ben's coronation. Jane stole the wand to give herself a makeover, but the magic of her mother 's wand flew out of control and made a hole in the island's barrier.

    Maleficent escaped to conquer Auradon. Everyone else attempted to leave, but found that the barrier was back in place. The villains watched the A. And now, the present day, a few days after the last book.

    All of Auradon's kingdoms hold celebrations, which lead up to the cotillion, in honor of the U. Watching Sebastian lead a wonderful musical performance are none other than the VKs, having been invited by King Ben. Evie has also gained a new friend in Arabella, niece to Ariel ; Arabella copies Evie's outfits, although in shades of lilac. The celebration suddenly comes to an end when an unexpected storm strikes. Fearing it may be the disabled talismans of evil, the VKs decide to have Fairy Godmother destroy them before anything else happens.

    Retrieving her wand from the museum, Fairy Godmother improvises a version of Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo to destroy the talismans. However, this releases a burst of wild magic, which briefly causes the Isle of the Lost's dome to disappear; though since it's invisible to the islanders, no-one noticed.

    The next day, Ben is called away on royal business because Agrabah and Northern Wei are having a dispute that could end in violence. The Auradon Knights win against the merman team, elsewhere. Carlos convinces Jane to attend the cheerleader tryouts as she's better suited for it than being the Fighting Knights mascot.

    Trouble in paradise

    At the same time, Jay joins the R. Evie finds Mal using her spell book to avoid detention for being late to class, scolding her. They later find Arabella upset, and learn that she caused the storm yesterday by trying to use her grandfather's trident.

    However, she lost control of it and it flew away. The VKs decide to help find it. Back on the Isle of the Lost, Uma learns that a goblin saw the trident fell into the waters of the isle when the barrier briefly vanished. Everyone is looking for it; even if it isn't magic, it can be used to barter one's way off this accursed prison.

    Uma decides that it's time to put together a crew to work for her, hearing Captain Hook is hosting a race and will give the Lost Revenge to whoever wins. She joins the race, convincing Harry Hook to be her first mate; they win the Lost Revenge, recruiting Gaston 's son Gil and other rogues. Uma learns from her fellow employee at the shop that Yen Sid knows where the pieces of Ursula's necklace are; once it's re-completed, it will be able to seek out the trident like a magnet.

    The Descendants (novel) - Wikipedia

    Harry's research reveals that Yen Sid brought his intern, Sophie with him to the island when he relocated; this is the only weak link they can work on, since Yen Sid will never give in to intimidation and torture. Claiming to have found something Sophie lost, Gil lures her to chip shop. After a mind-numbing hour of listening to Sophie talk, Gil begs Uma to step in. Uma inquires what Sophie is searching for, remaining vague as to whether or not she can provide it. Sophie reveals that Yen Sid's hat was taken to be mended at the hat shop, but it got sold to someone else; the sorcerer mainly uses it to hide his bald spot, since its magic is neutralized by the barrier.

    Remembering Gil bought it, Uma takes it from him and threatens to burn it unless Sophie tells her when the necklace is. Sophie relents and tell her its hidden on the Isle of the Doomed. He learns that grapes from Agrabah have been falling over the great wall and that the flying carpets give off sonic booms. Ben and Lonnie decide to talk with the royal vizier of Agrabah, who is shocked by how humble Lonnie is. She is the daughter of the famous Mulan after all. Deciding a compromise is best, Ben gets the permission of the sultan and emperor to build a great door into the wall to allow Agrabahians to come and go as they please; the two societies decide to exchange tips on agriculture as well.

    Before he can leave, Ben is swept into a magical whirlwind as a familiar voice tells him that he is needed elsewhere Back to the VKs, they attempt to "borrow" a speedboat from the royal marina, but are caught red-handed by Fairy Godmother; she refuses to listen to their reasons, simply believing they couldn't resist misbehaving. Escorted back to Auradon Prep, they pass Jane , who distraught at the idea of them leaving.

    Right before Fairy Godmother can punish them, Ben arrives and gives the cover story of the VKs working on a secret mission for him. After explaining the situation, the VKs learn that Jane had Merlin bring him back to prevent their expulsion. They take the speedboat out to the isle of the lost to get the trident back.

    Uma finds her mother's seashell necklace and puts it back together; however a piece is missing. She then realizes a piece of the shell was in her pendant; Ursula had vaguely told her it was all she had left, but not of what.

    With the shell completed, it begins leading Uma to the trident. She finds it's location, and swims down to get it. Outside of the barrier, Mal and the others arrive; she reverses time by a few minutes, keeping Uma away from the trident. Using her own spell, Mal pulls the trident into her hand, but loses her glove to the pull of the seashell necklace. The VKs succeed in their mission, leaving Uma fuming; she ended up with Mal's glove instead.

    This is a layered story of loss, acceptance, discovery and those first few steps to a new life. Matt King has had everything handed to him in life. The descendant of a Hawaiian princess and a white missionary, he is the controlling partner of a family trust overseeing a great deal of Hawaiian land. He has made his life on his I was hesitant to read this book.

    He has made his life on his own terms, living on his earned income. He has avoided the responsibility of the trust while building his business and is now faced with the decision for all of the heirs on whether they should sell their legacy.

    Meanwhile, his wife is in a coma after being injured in a boating race. As the coma continujes, Matt and his two daughters must decide on her future and theirs. As they say good-bye to one life, they start on another. This was an extremely moving story that explored many topics and relationships. I sat up to 2 am one night to finish it and then cried myself to sleep.

    This book moved me. View all 7 comments. Dec 05, SA rated it it was ok Shelves: You know, it's not until I start reading contemporary fiction that I remember I don't especially enjoy it.

    Not to be simplistic, but if there isn't a dead body, a spaceship, or magic, I'm not the immediate target market for your book. I picked this one up, though, because it continues my theme of reading books set in Hawai'i, and because the film based on the book has been released. It took more than half the book to sympathize with the character--he doesn't talk about love that he has for his w You know, it's not until I start reading contemporary fiction that I remember I don't especially enjoy it.

    It took more than half the book to sympathize with the character--he doesn't talk about love that he has for his wife until , which was uncomfortable given the dramatic situation his family was in. It's hard to feel sympathy for a parent who's neglected his children, and a partner who has neglected his wife, that's just waking up to "oh shit I guess I have to step up now.

    In the novel, especially from his first-person perspective, I kept fighting the urge to roll my eyes. The manner of writing was journeyman, and I got a fair amount of the sense of place, but I think I'm used to more deft, thorough portrayals of Hawai'i as a genus locii because something was missing for me.

    The characters inhabited but didn't pay attention to their space, and the author went so far as to bring that to the reader's attention a few times in the text.

    I don't know how I feel about it, fundamentally. Vaguely dissatisfied that it wasn't a murder mystery? Bored by the concept of a husband and father finally waking up to his responsibilities? I didn't really have expectations, but I think I was dissatisfied. Perhaps that was the point. Dec 29, Neal Sanders rated it it was amazing. At heart, all novelists are dreamers. We concoct vivid stories from fleeting, overheard comments and turn complex ideas into 85, words of captivating prose.

    As we write, we envision other people absorbing our words and finding pleasure or guidance in them. If we are honest, we cherish the idea that our stories might reach tens of thousands — or hundreds of thousands - of readers. And, if we truly dream big, we envision our words finding their way onto the screen so that millions of people who At heart, all novelists are dreamers. And, if we truly dream big, we envision our words finding their way onto the screen so that millions of people who are not ordinarily readers will discover our words and at least some will go back to the source material and read what we originally wrote.

    We mentally cast those films — Meryl Streep for the female lead, of course, and maybe George Clooney for the male starring role. I can only imagine what Kaui Hart Hemmings felt when she learned that her debut novel not only had been optioned by a respected director, but that it had attracted Mr. I am one of those people who saw the movie and immediately sought out the book. Hemmings tells a tale filled with interior monologues about contemporary Hawaii, parenting, and the pain of discovering that the life you thought was good turned out to be unbearable to your spouse.

    Matt is forced to confront children whom he never really knew and the new-found discovery that his wife was in love with another man. It falls to director Payne to add scenes that take the family to the land to which they were entrusted and to flesh out the conflicts that roil the extended family that will be affected by the sale. That new-found knowledge is the catalyst for what follows: The movie visually shows us a Hawaii that tourists never contemplate.

    I read it in two sittings and then put it in the shelf I reserve for books I intend to read again. Apr 01, Phyllis rated it really liked it. This is the story of a family in Hawaii. The father is a busy lawyer , his wife is in a coma from a boating accident.

    His two daughters he has know idea how to cope with them. He has not spent a lot of time with them and now must be both father and mother.

    He is a descendant of a Hawaiian princess who married a white land owner. I loved this book. It was well written, funny, sad, and you could see the changes in the characters as the story developed.

    Decisions had to be made about the wife's wor This is the story of a family in Hawaii. Decisions had to be made about the wife's worsening condition. I saw the movie about three years ago and loved it also. View all 3 comments. Dec 14, Faith rated it it was ok.

    For me, this fell flat. Probably my fault for expecting too much out of this read. Unbelievable and unlikable characters abound in this book. I don't mind books that have just unlikeable characters so much as they're explained and built up to where can we can understand their choices and personalities. This book just didn't deliver that in my opinion. The author had opportunities to explain these characters and build up the plot but choose not to for some reason.

    Honestly regret reading this book but did so because I'm going to see the movie with some family. I've heard it's b Unbelievable and unlikable characters abound in this book. I've heard it's better than the book but was changed a lot plot wise.

    I'll cross my fingers that this is true. Mar 05, Snotchocheez rated it really liked it. So goes Part Two of my tour of source material for Alexander Payne movies; a director notoriously finicky in culling through relatively unknown authors' works, and in my opinion spinning gold from straw. I'm happy to report that, unlike Rex Pickett's clunky, only occasionally funny but more often annoying Sideways Part One of my tour , Kaui Hart Hemmings' The Descendants is every bit as good as the movie, perhaps even slightly better.

    The story of middle-aged haole-Hawaiian Matt King's comi So goes Part Two of my tour of source material for Alexander Payne movies; a director notoriously finicky in culling through relatively unknown authors' works, and in my opinion spinning gold from straw. The story of middle-aged haole-Hawaiian Matt King's coming to a life crossroads as his wife lies in a coma is, on the surface, not exactly something that screams out "Film Me, Hollywood!

    In fact, Payne stuck so closely to the book in his adaptation of it, it could almost be mistaken as a screenplay, or one of those books-adapted-from-the movie deals. Hart Hemmings for actually making me cry, where the movie version did not.

    Hopefully the success from the movie adaptation of her work will provide impetus for her to continue writing; I for one am eager to read more from her.

    Hart Hemmings: Young Scottie's wardrobe nearly always consisted of non-age-appropriate novelty tee shirts, one of which helpfully read "Mrs.

    You can almost see Payne's gears spinning with that one Of course ya did, Alexander. View all 5 comments. I really liked this. I saw the movie before reading the book, which I hate doing because I feel the book gets ruined. I'm always ready to be "at the good parts" the movie showed. But, in my true fashion I cared for the book more than the movie, but both were great.

    I liked how the booked delved into the characters of Sid and Joannie. Sid seems so random in the movie, but his character actually makes a lot of sense.

    This might be harsh, but I had abosolutely no simpathy for Joannie's character. She seemed like a really messed up person who messed up the lives of her husband and children. I don't like her, and I feel I should feel bad saying that since the character is dying. But, I don't. I think she's a bitch. I acutally laughed out load at some parts.

    Which again, asks the question is it appropriate since someone is dying?

    Tricky, tricky Miss Hemmings! In some ways this the character of Matt King reminded me of my dad and the daughters of myself and my younger sister minus the whole drug use thing. My mom actually cheated and left our family, so I grew up with a single dad. We, along with my brother, would say just about anything in front my dad I couldn't help to think, did my dad have the same thoughts as Matt King when he heard things come out of our mouths?

    I'm sure we made for some really awkward moments and questions about parenting, just like it did for Matt. Read it. Just know there is adult humor, not gross humor, but adult. I found it appropriate in this novel. Happy reading! After seeing the movie, I decided to read the book, in order to better understand character motivation. The movie is surprisingly faithful to the structure of the book but the character of the wife is fleshed out much better in the novel.

    Matt King, the titular head of an extended family with traces of Hawaiian blood, is in charge of deciding what developer to sell the family's pristine Hawaiian land to. Between trying to make that decision mostly by avoiding it and focusing too much on his wo After seeing the movie, I decided to read the book, in order to better understand character motivation.

    Between trying to make that decision mostly by avoiding it and focusing too much on his work as a lawyer, he's become distant from his wife and two bratty daughters, ten year old Scottie and seventeen year old Alex.

    When Joanie, Matt's wife, falls into a coma after a boating accident, Matt is forced into becoming a father again, and also to face some unpleasant truths about himself, the woman he believes he's always loved, and exactly why he may have removed himself from his immediate family. Though the book is braver than the movie, in that it makes it clear the family is better off without Joanie, I didn't believe a word of it and, for that matter, the movie, either.

    Both are very well constructed entertainments with exactly the strings you expect to be pulled exactly when you expect them to be. The prose is simplistic though I don't mean that critically -- it goes down very easily and is not without humor and pathos. But for such serious subject matter the book is very lightweight; though I admire the author for having the courage to write a book where the family is better off without the mother even though she isn't an obvious or heavy handed villianous presence , the book has little resonance.

    I felt manipulated rather than genuinely moved. Jul 19, Martie Nees Record rated it liked it. If you saw the movie you just about read the book. I picked this book because it is set in the Hawaiian Islands and that is where my family and I were vacationing this year. I had previously seen the movie because George Clooney but the book is so much better. During the story Matthew and his two girls grow close as they come t I picked this book because it is set in the Hawaiian Islands and that is where my family and I were vacationing this year.

    Such a heartwarming coming to terms with what God throws at you kind of story. The narrator is busy pulling out his hair while he figures out what to do with his wild children who in turn are trying to figure out what to do about growing up. Throw in a morbidly injured and cheating mother and life is just hell breaking loose. So how does Dad make them a family again?

    And can they find closure? Where is the trust? The only things I knew about this book when I started it were that it was a movie, and the movie was set in Hawaii.

    That being said, The Descendants surprised me greatly by becoming one of the best books I've read all year and I've read a few books. I'm not going to dwell too much on the plot. The reason to read this book is because of the characters. They are dysfunctional, flawed, lovable, laughable and larger than life. My favorite character is, by far, the protagonist's, Matt King's, yea The only things I knew about this book when I started it were that it was a movie, and the movie was set in Hawaii.

    My favorite character is, by far, the protagonist's, Matt King's, year-old daughter, Scottie, not only because is she hilarious, but because she is in major need of a hug. Hemming's descriptions of Scottie are endearing and terrifying at the same time. From her wardrobe choices to to the food stuck in her hair, Scottie is a great representation of everything that is spiraling out of control in the King's life.

    I think another of the reasons I liked this book so much was because of my time spent in Hawaii. One could say that Hawaii itself is a character in Hemming's book, and I think anyone who has really spent time in Hawaii would agree with this statement.

    Her small details of the lifestyle and the entire sub-plot about being descendants bring the Hawaiian culture - past and present - to life.

    I read some reviews about how ridiculous it is to consider the legacy of being descendants a burden, and that the title of The Descendants is irrelevant to the actual book. To those reviewers I state, you don't understand Hawaiian culture. I can't say that I am an aficionado on the subject, but I understand enough to know that Hemmings paints a very realistic view of modern Hawaii in how it is struggling to maintain is ties to its Polynesian heritage and move into the future as an American state.

    Now obviously this is fiction, but the topics Hemmings broaches are very real and not irrelevant. If you are at all interested in Hawaii, and I mean the Hawaii outside of the manicured resorts, pay attention to the details in Hemmings work. I have a feeling her future work will also play with these themes, and I look forward to reading more about a very special place. I recommend this book.

    Mar 13, Alicia rated it really liked it. Although the movie put George Clooney in my head the whole time I was reading, I really could see him in the role of Matt King. Loved the nod to him on page 44 when Scottie, the 10 year old daughter, was described as wearing a Mrs.

    Clooney t-shirt! I am looking forward to seeing the adaptation. I found humor and affection in Matt's irreverent style of parenting. Their family situation might seem unconventional and judgement-worthy, but truthfully there is at least a hint of both the marital s Although the movie put George Clooney in my head the whole time I was reading, I really could see him in the role of Matt King.

    While You Were Out

    Their family situation might seem unconventional and judgement-worthy, but truthfully there is at least a hint of both the marital state and the parenthood state in many families. His daughters were each dealing with their emotions in such a different and overt way.

    And I really enjoyed what Sid brought to the story. So much going on with Matt, yet so little shown on the outside. I'm guessing Clooney can pull that off well. Love the karma brought down on Joanie not her physical situation, but the reader gets it by the end of the book. She was not very likeable. At weddings we roll our eyes at the burgeoning love around us, the vows that we know will morph into new kids of promises: I vow not to kiss you when you're trying to read.

    I will tolerate you in sickness and ignore you in health. I promise to let you watch that stupid news show about celebrities, since you're so disenchanted with your own life. Like a badass but older. I hate when people say how brave someone is when really they're just surviving. Jul 14, Book Concierge rated it liked it Shelves: Audio book performed by Jonathan Davis 3. His great-grandfather was a missionary who married a Hawaiian princess, making Matt a royal descendant and owner with his cousins of one of the largest pieces of undeveloped real estate in the islands.

    But that is not his focus these days. His wife Joanie lies in a coma after a boating accident and he is left trying to deal with his two daughters — year-old Scottie and year Audio book performed by Jonathan Davis 3. His wife Joanie lies in a coma after a boating accident and he is left trying to deal with his two daughters — year-old Scottie and year-old Alexandra.

    And then he discovers that before the accident, his wife was having an affair and planning to leave him for her new love. This is a contemplative novel, and Davis does a fine job of narrating it. In the beginning I found his slow, deliberate reading just too ponderous.

    I wanted to get on with the story. However, I soon came to realize that this cautious performance was perfect for voicing Matt King as he observes and absorbs what his family really is vs what he thought it was, considers his options re his inherited land, and contemplates what to do with the new information he has about Joanie. The book is better than the movie, as any character-driven work would be.

    I would read another work by Hemmings. This is a hard book to read, and ironically it's because the language is so easy.

    Matt King, the protagonist, isn't trying to impress you with his intelligence or make beautiful words. He's just trying to make sense of his life -- his wife is in a coma in the hospital, and his two girls, Scottie and Alex Or teenagers. He's a father without any guidebook or external support, and he's telling himself that things are going to be okay, and his wife is going to come out o This is a hard book to read, and ironically it's because the language is so easy.

    He's a father without any guidebook or external support, and he's telling himself that things are going to be okay, and his wife is going to come out of the coma and calm the girls down, and they're going to have a great story to tell. And at the same time he's saying this, you know he doesn't believe it. He's behaving in the way he thinks a father should act, and trying to be an adult as best as he can, in a life that he can't quite believe is his.

    And he has to work out what to do next. This is one of the most accurate portrayals of grief I've ever seen. He's aware he's supposed to feel a certain way and doing certain things. But instead he's annoyed that his children are swearing, wondering about the finances and whether he's got time to pick up groceries.

    He's awkward. And his children are watching him and reflecting that back to him. It's a great book.

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